Eucharist 2 – who we are

 

1 Corinthians 11:20-27 and Luke 14:15-24

A couple in their 90s die suddenly in a freak accident. Up till that point they had been in excellent health, due to the wife’s interest in health food.

When they reached the pearly gates, St. Peter took them to their mansion, with beautiful kitchen, swimming pool, lovely view. As they “oohed and aahed”, the old man asked Peter how much all this was going to cost.

“It’s free,” Peter replied, Remember, this is Heaven.”

Next they went out back to see the championship golf course next door. Each week the course changed to a new one representing the greatest golf courses on Earth. The old man asked, “What are the green fees?”

“This is heaven,” St. Peter replied. “You play for free.”

Next they went to the clubhouse and saw the lavish buffet lunch with the cuisines of the world laid out. “How much to eat?” asked the old man.

“Don’t you understand yet?” St. Peter asked. “This is heaven. It’s free!”

“Where are the low fat and low cholesterol foods?” the old man asked timidly.

“That’s the best part…you can eat as much as you like of whatever you like and you never get fat and you never get ill. This is Heaven.”

The old man looked at his wife and said, “You and your stupid bran muffins. I could have been here twenty years ago!”

When Jesus talks about heaven, how does he imagine it? He certainly doesn’t talk about harps and clouds at all. As far as I’m aware he mentions Paradise just once – to the thief on the cross who puts his trust in Jesus right at the end of his life. Because he turns to Christ he is forgiven and will be in Paradise.

But mostly the image Jesus uses is a banquet. ‘Blessed is the person who will eat bread in the Kingdom of God’ says a dinner guest piously. Jesus has just said something challenging and it seems that the guest is one of those people who tries to defuse tension by saying something that all can agree on. But Jesus isn’t going to let an opportunity pass.

He responds by telling a parable about a banquet. How lucky indeed those will be who eat in the kingdom. So make sure you respond to God’s invitation! Don’t take it for granted, says Jesus!

Elsewhere in the gospels, Jesus talks about feasting in the Kingdom of God. You and I are invited to a glorious celebration, a wedding banquet thrown by God. And I don’t mean the sort of party where you make polite conversation with people you’ll never see again while wishing you had three hands because you’re standing up and it’s impossible to eat canapes from a plate while holding a glass of imitation Prosecco.

No, God invites us to abundant joy. To celebration and fulfilment. To the whole company of the redeemed. Not the smug nuclear family of the Christmas adverts. This is a celebration that involves the full communion of the saints – all those who have belonged to Christ. The vast breadth of people from every race, nation and language who have accepted Christ will be there. It will make the Olympic opening ceremony look tame by comparison. We are invited. God calls each one of us today to make a response – to say yes to him, be forgiven, and then live his way…

This feast, this gracious invitation from God, this inclusive celebration is symbolised and foreshadowed in the Eucharist. Holy Communion is a picture of God’s heavenly banquet. Here God invites us to come to his love feast. To join in celebration with all those others he has called. Today we will explore what the Eucharist says about us. How it symbolises the diversity of God’s people. How it calls us into fellowship with one another. How it creates a new Kingdom community.

Isn’t it interesting that in the Gospel reading from Luke several people refuse the host’s invitation? And they do so for individualistic reasons. The activities they do instead are not about community: they are solitary and could be done anytime: inspecting a field, trying out oxen. Even having a new wife begs the question ‘why not bring her along and share your joy?’

Are the people rejecting the invitation because they turn away from others? Now of course, for an extravert who likes being in a crowd it is easy to be the life and soul of the party. For a bookish introvert a party can be a fearsome thing. I don’t think Jesus is talking about that – not least because the things the introvert may be concerned about such as looking stupid or being rejected, those fears are not issues in heaven.

No, the ungrateful guests are rejecting the host and his character. They don’t want to be part of his celebration. They prefer to be independent rather than receive blessing from others. They don’t want to share with the guests he has invited, community holds no attraction for them, the openness, even vulnerability that fellowship requires is a step too far.

It reminds me of the old style 8 o’clock. When I was a curate about two dozen came to prayer book communion. There was plenty of room in the choir stalls but several people preferred to be miles away from anyone in a church that could seat 800. There was quite an emphasis on ‘making my communion with God’ – but rather less on communicating with one another. I knew a chap who even used to leave before the clergy had reached the door so that he didn’t have to speak to anyone.

I can see how such a service could provide a place of refuge for those who have been deeply damaged. It can hold them in a safe place but it’s contact with others which gives the chance of greater healing. Being willing to share your pew, offering the peace, staying for coffee after the service are much more than just being sociable. They are God given means of grace, ministries by which we can welcome one another, build relationships and support fellow Christians on the journey of faith. Meeting is a way that we can encourage one another in living out the gospel in the coal-face of Christian living: at work, home, school.

For God’s mission in the world is not done by the clergy, it’s carried out Christians in the front line – by the lay people. It’s lay people who have contact with other folks through their work, school, home or social interests. You can be the light of Christ for them, show his love, speak of him. It’s your work that makes a difference for the Kingdom in the world.

The job of the clergy is to resource the wider church, to support through ministry of word and sacrament the laity who are on the frontline of God’s mission.

So think of how we can support one another in our work for the Kingdom. That time after the service is potentially a real blessing. It’s not just for the clergy; it’s a chance for all of us, the whole body of Christ, to share in real ministry. Ministry belongs to everyone – the whole people of God.

Stay if you possibly can. Speak to different people. What about those you know well? Can I challenge you to raise your game? Go a bit deeper: what’s are you doing this week? What did you think of the sermon? And be willing to open up yourself, for it’s as we share with one another that trust and support grow. That does require us to step out and make the effort. But if we can kneel at the rail and open our hands to receive the presence of God, surely we can stand and recognise his presence in one another.

In the parable the host throws open his doors. He invites those who are truly vulnerable, the disabled and rough sleepers, people despised and rejected because society believes they have nothing to offer. The Bishop of Chichester, Dr Martin Warner, recently spoke of seeing a peer of the realm and a man recently released from prison kneeling side-by-side to receive the sacrament. Humility before Christ removes all pretensions to status; in His presence we are all equal: sinners redeemed and saints in the making.

When the God’s people can embody this grace, it is an incredibly powerful witness. Which is why St Paul is so frustrated in the reading from 1st Corinthians. Imagine how revolutionary it would have been in Romans times for slaves and masters to share communion together! That symbolism would undermine the whole institution of slavery.

But the Corinthians weren’t practising equality. Their Eucharist took place in a meal, and it seems that it wasn’t so much Bring and Share as Bring and Scoff. The idle rich arrived early and ate their banquets. When the slaves had done all their tasks, there was nothing left for them to eat. ‘Do you show contempt for the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing?’ says Paul. Because of their disunity, it is not really the Lord’s Supper they are eating. Division means they are not recognising the body of Christ. It is a kind of blasphemy when they say they’re celebrating the Body of Christ in bread and wine but not recognising the human Body of Christ right in front of them.

It’s so important that we act on division quickly. If you’ve got an issue with someone there are several things you can do. Firstly, don’t grumble about them to everyone else but approach them directly. The most destructive thing to relationships is an undercurrent of grumbling that never gets addressed. Secondly, best not to send emails or even letters – they are so easily misunderstood – but pluck up your courage and speak face to face. Thirdly don’t accuse or lose your temper, but speak honestly, owning the emotions you feel. ‘When you did that I felt hurt because…how can we stop that happening again?’

We share the Peace because Jesus told us to be reconciled with one another before we approach God in worship. Hopefully sharing the peace reflects good quality relationships that do exist – but if there are problems may it also be a reminder that we need to sort them out.

Perhaps this episode explains why the church moved away from celebrating the Eucharist as a meal. It can be very powerful when we do – perhaps we ought to more. We have celebrated a Maundy Thursday supper – are there other times when the church can gather for Eucharist in a meal? Perhaps this is something we should do as a Gauzebrook Group, overcoming the isolation that can creep into rural life.

When people share communion together it can be an incredibly powerful symbol of reconciliation. We are who are many are one body because we all share in one bread. The Eucharist both expresses the unity of the God’s people the church – and creates it. When we share the bread we are united in our common dependence on Christ. When we drink from one cup we acknowledge that each one of us is here because we have responded to his love poured out on the cross. As we kneel together we affirm our equality in God’s sight and as we rise we look forward to that heavenly banquet. In the meantime, let us go and be Christ’s body in the world. Amen.

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