The Lost Coin – Luke 15:1-10

One of the small hidden bonuses of being a Vicar, is that I am never short of an umbrella. Whenever it rains, whether I am in church or at home, I know there will be a healthy stock of unclaimed lost property. It’s remarkable how many things are never reclaimed: glasses, coats, even car keys (with that latter I wonder: how did that person get home?)

Some items are so essential that you just can’t give up searching. Have you ever lost your phone with diary on it? Occasionally happens with me, and the house must be turned upside down.

Jesus parables often use familiar situations, like anxiously mislaying something precious and spending all day looking for it. The story of the lost sheep is perhaps the best known of all parables, and the lost coin is its less familiar cousin. (The plot is virtually identical: v.8-9.)

It always struck me as a little bit odd that the woman throws a party. She loses her coin, finds it again, and hosts a celebration. So how does she pay for the food and drink? It’s as if she gets her coin back and gives it away again.

But, I’ve discovered, apparently it was the custom for women to wear their dowry as a kind of headband. The coins would be linked together on a string across her forehead. This woman has ten silver coins, given by her family when she was married. They represent the family’s investments, and her savings in case her husband dies before her. Losing one of them is like mislaying a tenth of your pension fund. No wonder she lights a lamp, spring cleans and searches high and low.

As she was given it when she was married, the coin is also like a wedding ring. I was with Susannah at a play park when a little girl’s grandpa lost his wedding ring in the sand. You can imagine the anxiety as family were called over. Fortunately granny was level headed: Don’t move grandpa, she called. They couldn’t see it on the surface, so they gently raked the sand, there was a glint: all was well and there was great celebration when the lost was found.

The value of the ring may have been a few hundred pounds, yet the sentimental value was far more. It’s the same for the woman in the parable – the coin stands for her husband’s love, the bond uniting them.

And Jesus tells us in v.10 ‘Just so there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents’. The point is that we matter to God even more than the coin matters to the woman. God loves us immensely. Not for what we can do for him –who is God that he should need us? God is not some kind of hard up factory foreman who needs all the workers he can get. No, he searches for us because he loves us, because he values us for who we are.

Understand that and it can make a big difference to the way you see yourself. For knowing that you are loved by God is the most stabilising foundation. So many people’s self esteem depends on their achievements or what people think of them. Not so for the Christian – we know that we are treasured by God. Many insecurities come because people are not sure they are valued. The lost coin tells us that each one of us is valued by God.

It teaches us grace too, because the love of God is freely given. We do not have to win God’s regard, nor do we need to strive to stay within the Lord’s affection. His love for us is constant. He longs for those who have wandered to return to him and allowed Jesus to die to save them. Yes, God urges us to repent, to turn away from sin, not because sin stops him loving us, but because the barriers we raise cut us off from his cascading love. So when we do good it is not to justify ourselves, but rather it is a grateful response to his love, and a recognition that doing good is the right way to live.

Getting to grips with the message of this parable may also change our prayers. If we know that God loves us for who we are, then it follows that he enjoys knowing us. He appreciates our company. So prayer is more than presenting a list of requests to the Lord, it is spending time in his presence.

You can talk to him about the day, look back on what has happened, let him into your worries for the future. You can be honest with him, essentially chat. A vicar I knew had a wonderful way of describing prayer: he said it was ‘wasting time with God’. In the way that you might just sit and waste time, leisurely chat with a friend, enjoy their company. There are bound to be times when prayer feels more like a task or a duty, but remember when you pray, God wants to know you.

And if he wants to know you, he wants to know others too. Verses 1 and 2 tell us the background to these two parables: ‘Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to Jesus. The Pharisees and Scribes were grumbling and saying ‘This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.’

How tragic is that! They couldn’t see that here were people coming to life and truth! They couldn’t see the wonder and joy of bad people being forgiven and made whole! They Pharisees couldn’t see that they themselves were sinners, and needed God’s forgiveness! It’s been said that evangelism is ‘one begger telling another where to find bread’ – but they couldn’t see it like that. And so rather than rejoice over the growth of the kingdom they chuntered about Jesus’ poor taste in company. Happily, Jesus’ words did bring change, and Pharisees like Paul eventually shared in going to find the lost.

If we’re to hear the message of this parable, I think it means three things. Firstly, God’s people need to seek out the lost. The shepherd didn’t stand in one place calling out ‘Come by’. He sought out the lost sheep. Churches throughout history have been very good at being visible in one place and inviting people ‘Come in and see’. But we also need to go out. We also need to act intentionally to reach those who haven’t heard the gospel.

Just last week our Children’s Worker and I had a visit from a major grant making trust. They’re deciding whether to support Becky’s work here – please pray that they do! One of the key questions for their trustees is: ‘Do we try and get people to come to church, or do we go to where they are?

The Trust Secretary was telling me that in Northern Ireland there’s a new move away from the church setting up toddler groups or lunch clubs. They find it’s too heavy on resources and you spend all your time trying to get people to come to things. Instead Christians in Northern Ireland are helping the groups that already exist, and being salt and light there. Interesting idea.

In our own Group, Becky provides Sunday clubs for children and we want children to grow up in the church. But we also recognise that if we want to reach them all then we have to go to the schools – for that’s where the children are. Like the shepherd, we have to go out, intentionally seek the lost.

How do you and I do that? In our villages and at work?

On the 22nd September at 7.30 pm we’ve got a meeting in Holy Cross to plan our vision in the Gauzebrook Group for the next three years. Questions like that will be really important and I want to hear your views. Please come.

Secondly, the parable tells us ‘Don’t be like the Pharisees. Rejoice over the lost!’ I know a Vicar who got his first parish a few years ago. The church was looking for someone outgoing who’d grow the congregation. They got what they asked for – and some more! After a while he made some changes to the morning service. Which worked – the congregation doubled!

It wasn’t long before he got complaints. ‘We need to buy more coffee nowadays and we don’t know how much’. ‘All these children are very noisy.’ ‘The Vicar doesn’t have time to speak to us anymore.’ That church got what they asked for, but they also found that growth involves sacrifice. Like the Pharisees, rejoicing in the lost didn’t come naturally, it was easier to see the challenges that the lost brought.

So thirdly, Jesus invites us to enter into the world of lost things. To imagine life without God – what does it feel like to be lost? Do you remember a time when you had no direction, were not aware of God’s presence? When you had no-one to turn to? Surely we can feel for those who live and die without having heard God’s call to turn to him and be forgiven? Surely people’s eternal destiny puts our little inconveniences into perspective? When we think on these things and ask for God’s heart of love, we can begin to feel his passion for the lost.

Some of the lost are more like the sheep, others like the coin. What about us? Were we like the sheep, wilfully wandering from the right path, its own worst enemy, before God sought us out and called us back? Or were we like the coin, fallen down a corner, mislaid in a dark world that has lost its way, our spirituality all dusty and cobwebby? Jesus describes two slightly different situations, but the response in both cases is the same: God seeks the lost. He looks until he has found. And when a sinner responds to God’s call, there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of God.

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